DENTAL INFORMATION - Archived

Below, you will find information on the following topics:

SMILE ANALYSIS

Dental Segment show 155

Air Date: 2/3/02

Our dental expert, Dr. Steven Marsh, will teach us what our smiles say to others, and how the magic of cosmetic dentistry can help you achieve the impression you desire.

Question: I know that, in your practice, you take care of a lot of media personalities and models. Why does the media put such an emphasis on smiles? What affects how people view your smile?
 

Answer: According to my clients, the most important elements of the face are the eyes and the smile/teeth.  Several factors play in to how people view your smile.

 

First is your lip formation.  On some people’s smiles, the lip may come up high and reveal some of your gum tissue. (ex: Katie Couric) Also, the lower lip may be either rounded or straight across.  What to aim for: No excessive gums showing. The lower lip should be rounded. How to get it: The height of the gum can be altered. Flattering lip color can also be an issue
 

Second, the edge/line of teeth.  What to look for: Whether the edge or line of the teeth goes straight across or is curved.  What to aim for: The line of the upper teeth should mimic the line of the lower lip.  How to get it: Teeth can be reshaped to give flattering lines and edges.

Next, the color of teeth: What to look for: The brightness of teeth.  What to aim for: Whiter teeth are brighter and more youthful looking.  How to get it: We can whiten the smile using either whitening trays of a new technique called Bright Smile. Bright Smile takes place in the dentist’s office and only takes 1 ˝ hours to complete.
 

Also, broken teeth: What to look for: Teeth are broken.  What to aim for: No broken teeth.  How to get it: Bonding, caps and veneers can fix decaying and broken teeth.

---Steven Marsh, DDS

For more information:
Steven Marsh, DDS
440-461-1003
www.ClevelandSmiles.com

DENTAL FILLINGS

Dental Segment show 160

Air Date: 3/10/02

 

 

We all know that tooth decay is a pain, but choosing the wrong filling for you can add to your troubles. Should we stick to unsightly silver, or are the new, tooth-colored fillings just as long-lasting? Today, our dental expert Dr. Steven Marsh will “fill” us in on the topic of fillings.

Question: It used to be that you would go to the dentist and he would simply fill a cavity. Now, however, there are many choices when it comes to fillings. What kinds are available?
 

Answer: Well, silver used to be the filling of choice, but there are some reasons why you might not want to use this kind of filling any longer:
First, more of the tooth structure has to be cut away for the filling to stay in.  Silver fillings may break down over time, leading to further tooth decay.  Half of the silver filling is actually mercury, and this is not good for your system. In fact, this is banned in some European countries.  Finally, the color is terrible.

Question: If silver is not optimal, what about gold? More natural looking fillings?

Answer: Gold is used if an individual has other gold fillings from the past. You want to have the same materials touching each other in the mouth.  However, now you can have tooth colored fillings.  If the decay is shallow, a tooth-colored hand-packed composite can be used to fill the tooth.  If the decay is deep and wide, a tooth inlay may be necessary.  Both the composite and the inlays come in many shades so that we can match almost any tooth for the most natural look.

 

Question: Say you already have silver fillings. Can you switch to composite fillings?
 

Answer: Yes. We can clean out the old silver fillings and put in tooth-colored fillings for a more natural look.  It looks better but is not necessary unless your old silver fillings are breaking down.

---Steven Marsh, DDS

For more information:
Steven Marsh, DDS
440-461-1003
www.ClevelandSmiles.com

DIFFERENT TYPES OF CROWNS AND CAPS

Dental Segment show 164

Air Date: 4/7/02

Have you been crowned lately? No, I’m not talking about royalty today, but we do have our king of dentistry, Dr. Steven Marsh,  to discuss how the right crown can enhance our smile.

 

Question: When do you use crowns or caps?
 

Answer: A crown or cap is used when a tooth has had a previous filling and the wall of the tooth is broken.  If extensive decay exists a cap, which surrounds the tooth, will strengthen it.

Question: What types of crowns are there?
 

Answer: There are four basic kinds of crowns.
 

  • Gold crowns. These are often used for back teeth where there is little room (clearance) between the top and bottom teeth. Gold is also used when the opposing tooth has been previously capped with a gold crown. It is most comfortable to have the same material on opposing teeth.

  • Porcelain crowns. Look very much like a real tooth. Used where you don’t need a strong tooth

  • Porcelain on gold crowns. Used to replace a previous crown that has gone down to the gum or below the gum. They are also used after a root canal, which leaves behind a dark tooth. A porcelain crown may not be opaque enough to block out the dark tooth beneath it, whereas the gold will be.

  • Reinforced composite crowns. Made of a type of plastic mixed with fibers. The tooth looks natural, transmitting color and light to look very real.

Question: Now, I’ve heard of bridges being used to replace teeth. Are they the same as a crown?
 

Answer: A bridge is a series of crowns splintered together.  It replaces a missing tooth or number of teeth.

 

Question: How long do crowns last?

Answer: On an average of 8-10 years.  Much depends on how well you take care of the crowns by brushing and flossing.  When you have your teeth cleaned at the dentist, he/she will treat the crowns carefully to protect the glaze.

Question: Do caps look natural?
 

Answer: With today’s materials, they should look just like real teeth.  The porcelain comes in different shades so that we can match almost anyone’s teeth.


---Steven Marsh, DDS

For more information:
Steven Marsh, DDS
440-461-1003
www.ClevelandSmiles.com

BRIGHT SMILE

Dental Segment show 168

Air Date: 5/19/02

Does your smile go from ear to ear or are you trying to hide a not-so-white grin? Our dental expert, Dr. Steven Marsh, will tell us about Bright Smile, the latest and quickest way to make your not-so-pearly whites as white as can be.


Question: Everyone would like to have a bright white smile. What causes teeth to darken?
 

Answer: Some foods such as coffee can stain teeth.   As you get older, your teeth lose enamel, the white outer covering. More of the dentin shows through, and that is yellow.

Question: How can we whiten our teeth?
 

Answer: The traditional tray method, which we’ve shown here before, still works. However, some people have a hard time wearing trays, and some find that bothersome.
Now, there is a new process called Bright Smile that can whiten your teeth within a few hours in your dentist’s office.
Your teeth are coated with a whitening gel, and your gums and lips are protected.  A light is shone on your teeth for three 20-minute sessions. At the end of the sessions, your teeth are whitened dramatically.


Question: Can you have Bright Smile done if you have dental work?
 

Answer: If you need to have dental work done, we recommend having the Bright Smile method first, so that the new dental work can match the lighter teeth.

Question: How long does the whiteness last?
 

Answer: One to three years, depending on your personal habits.  After that time period, you can come back for another Bright Smile session, or you can use trays to maintain the whiteness.

With Bright Smile, white teeth are just a dentist appointment away. My thanks to Dr. Marsh for really giving us something to smile about by showing us this new, easy technique. If you want to learn more about in having your teeth whitened with Bright Smile, Dr. Marsh is offering a free brochure.

---Steven Marsh, DDS

For more information:
Steven Marsh, DDS
440-461-1003
www.ClevelandSmiles.com

DENTAL ANESTHETICS

Dental Segment show 172

Air Date: 6/30/02

Going to the dentist should not be a pain in the . . . mouth, thanks to advanced anesthetics. And once we’re done, we don’t want to spend the rest of the day feeling and sounding like we have a mouthful of cotton. Our dental expert, Dr. Steven Marsh, is here today to tell us we don’t have to. He’ll discuss the techniques available to make sure we have a comfortable dental experience.

Question: I came to see you for a filling a few weeks ago, and as i=you know, I'm the biggest chicken.  I hate pain.  You were able to make the procedure absolutely painless.  Tell our viewers how you do that.

Answer: Local anesthetic.  Nerves are like electric lines, anesthetic is like a light switch, it blocks/turns off pain. We can do it very localized.

Question:   I had to see clients right after leaving your office.  I couldn't afford to be lethargic or drooling in my coffee.  Why isn't that a problem?

Answer:  Because the anesthetic is local, we can just go to specific spot, not the whole body, and it only last short time.

Question:   I was even afraid of the injections, but those were painless, too.  How is that done?

Answer:  We use a topical anesthetic.  We then inject one drop first to numb the area, then inject the rest of the anesthetic.

Question:   Are there any risks with these anesthetics?

Answer:  The anesthetics use Adrenalin, which can cause a rapid heartbeat.  You should tell the dentist if you have heart problems or high blood pressure.  The dentist can substitute lower/no adrenalin

Question:   When we talk anesthetics, are we talking about Novocain?

Answer: No - - some people are allergic to Novocain, so now we use new anesthetics that people are not allergic to.

---Steve Marsh, DDS

For more information:
Steven Marsh, DDS
440-461-1003
www.ClevelandSmiles.com

CLOSING SPACES

Dental Segment show 177

Air Date: 8/4/02

Extra closet space. Extra space on an airplane. There are lots of times we want extra space. But when the spaces are between our teeth, that can be a problem. Here to close the gap between an embarrassed frown and a beautiful smile, is Dr. Steven Marsh, a cosmetic and restorative dentist.

Question: What causes spaces in between teeth?
 

Answer: A space, which is technically called a “diastema,” may be a natural occurrence. The teeth may have simply erupted from the gum with space in between them. But other causes exist, especially when we age.
If teeth are lost in the back of the mouth, the other teeth can shift and spaces open up.
As we get older, the teeth toward the back wear down. This wearing often pushes up the upper front teeth.
Or teeth just naturally drift over time.

Question: What can be done to correct spaces between teeth?
 

Answer: One can see an orthodontist, even when they are older. Cosmetic dentistry has three different approaches to closing spaces in the mouth:

  • The first is hand bonding. In this technique, a plastic putty material (similar to tooth-like fillings) is added to the side of a tooth to close a space. If done well, it will blend in with the tooth.

  • Another example would be veneers. These are half crowns that go around the front of the tooth and wrap around the side. This is a stronger material than the bonding composite and is good to use when closing a larger space.

  • Finally, we can use crowns, especially when both spacing and decay are prevalent. A crown offers more support.

Question: And these solutions give a natural appearance?
 

Answer: Yes, we can match the veneers/crowns/composite with your tooth color. Oftentimes, patients like to whiten their teeth before work is done so that these can be matched to a new, whiter color.

Question: Closing spaces is your mouth is obviously aesthetically pleasing, but does it affect the health of your teeth?
 

Answer: That depends. If the space is very wide, it’s not harming your teeth. But a small space can trap food and debris, causing gum inflammation, decay, and embarrassment.

---Steve Marsh, DDS

 

For more information:
Steven Marsh, DDS
440-461-1003
www.ClevelandSmiles.com

BROKEN TEETH

Dental Segment show 179

Air Date: 8/18/02

Extra closet space. Extra space on an airplane. There are lots of times we want extra space. But when the spaces are between our teeth, that can be a problem. Here to close the gap between an embarrassed frown and a beautiful smile, is Dr. Steven Marsh, a cosmetic and restorative dentist.

Question: What causes spaces in between teeth?
 

Answer: A space, which is technically called a “diastema,” may be a natural occurrence. The teeth may have simply erupted from the gum with space in between them. But other causes exist, especially when we age.
If teeth are lost in the back of the mouth, the other teeth can shift and spaces open up.
As we get older, the teeth toward the back wear down. This wearing often pushes up the upper front teeth.
Or teeth just naturally drift over time.

Question: What can be done to correct spaces between teeth?
 

Answer: One can see an orthodontist, even when they are older. Cosmetic dentistry has three different approaches to closing spaces in the mouth:

  • The first is hand bonding. In this technique, a plastic putty material (similar to tooth-like fillings) is added to the side of a tooth to close a space. If done well, it will blend in with the tooth.

  • Another example would be veneers. These are half crowns that go around the front of the tooth and wrap around the side. This is a stronger material than the bonding composite and is good to use when closing a larger space.

  • Finally, we can use crowns, especially when both spacing and decay are prevalent. A crown offers more support.

Question: And these solutions give a natural appearance?
 

Answer: Yes, we can match the veneers/crowns/composite with your tooth color. Oftentimes, patients like to whiten their teeth before work is done so that these can be matched to a new, whiter color.

Question: Closing spaces is your mouth is obviously aesthetically pleasing, but does it affect the health of your teeth?
 

Answer: That depends. If the space is very wide, it’s not harming your teeth. But a small space can trap food and debris, causing gum inflammation, decay, and embarrassment.

---Steve Marsh, DDS

For more information:
Steven Marsh, DDS
440-461-1003
www.ClevelandSmiles.com

DENTAL HYGIENE:

SPECIAL CARE FOR CROWNS AND VENEERS

Dental Segment show 184

Air Date: 9/21/02

Just like Rodney Dangerfield dental hygiene, flossing and brushing get no respect. After today, that’s going to change. Proper dental hygiene can give you a great smile and save you hundreds of dollars too. Here to give us “Da Facts” on decay is da dentist, Dr. Steven Marsh, and Dental Hygienist Jennifer Dennison.

Question: When I think of dental hygiene, I first think of brushing and flossing. How often should one brush and floss each day?
 

Answer: Ideally, you should brush and floss after every time you eat, though people often do not do so.  At the least, you should brush and floss two times per day—in the morning after breakfast and before bed.
Also, add a warm saltwater rinse to your routine—it helps the health of your gums.

Question:   Does the type of toothpaste or toothbrush make a difference?
 

Answer: We recommend toothpaste that contains baking soda and peroxide.
Whitening toothpastes do not actually whiten your teeth—they remove stains, but no whitening occurs from the inside.
Use a soft bristle toothbrush. Actually, we recommend using an electric brush.  Electric toothbrushes allow individuals who may have arthritis to properly clean their teeth.  They also prevent you from scrubbing too hard and damaging your teeth. Brushing too hard can make the gums recede or even notch your teeth. (Analogy—like when washing a car, you want to get the dirt off but not dig into the paint).
 

Question: How often should you see your dental hygienist?
 

Answer: A mature adult should go every 3-4 months for cleaning and an exam. X-rays are generally given twice a year.

Question: So you recommend that seniors should go to the dental hygienist more often—are there any other points that seniors should watch out for?
 

Answer: Gum recession and the presence of more fillings can cause larger spaces to for in between the teeth—food traps, if you will. Floss will not work in these cases (too thin). You will need a proxy brush.
If you have crowns, you should remember that they still need to be cleaned like real teeth. Tartar can still sit along the gum line, and this can cause decay underneath the crown.
If you have crowns, you should use a nightly prescription fluoride treatment to help prevent this—Prevedent, for example

Question: I know you do a lot of cosmetic work—is there any other special ways to care for cosmetic dental work?

Answer:  Yes. Veneers are have a very shiny finish—you should use a non-abrasive, fine polishing paste.

You can have a smile that looks like a million dollars but didn’t cost you a million dollars, by following Steve’s and Jennifer’s tips. Good hygiene can make your smile look better, while protecting your precious teeth. For a free information sheet on good dental hygiene, call the number coming right up.

---Steve Marsh, DDS

For more information:
Steven Marsh, DDS
440-461-1003
www.ClevelandSmiles.com

 

DENTAL HYGIENE FOR DENTAL WORK

Dental Segment show 188

Air Date: 10/26/02

If you have crowns, caps, bridges or other dental work, are you off the hook? Can you skip brushing and flossing? Dental expert Doctor Steve Marsh is here to explain why taking care of your mouth is more important than ever for folks with dental work.


Question: Last time you were on, we talked about dental hygiene, and how taking care of your teeth properly can help keep them and your gums healthy. However, a lot of us already have dental work in our mouths. Once we have crowns, veneers, etc., is hygiene still as important an issue?
 

Answer: Definitely. Even more so. Having dental work can be compared to getting a new car—you still need to maintain your new mouth, perhaps even more carefully, just like you’d care for a new car.

Question:   You still have to visit your dental hygienist, even if your teeth are no longer “real?” Do you still have to worry about decay?
 

Answer: Yes. Food and debris still gathers at the gum line, and this can cause additional decay. Tartar and plaque still collect on dental work and have to be picked off.
 

Question: Can stains or plaque discolor our veneers or crowns?

 

Answer: Yes. The hygienist will use a special polish to remove the discoloration.  Think of it like china - - removing the tarnish maintains the color.


Question:   Can you tell us how to properly take care of our dental work? Let’s start with crowns.
 

Answer: If you have crowns, decay can occur along the edges where the crown touches the teeth.  We recommend that people with crowns use a prescription-strength fluoride, called Prevedent, before going to bed. This makes the tooth more resistant to decay.

Question: What special care should you take if you have porcelain veneers?
 

Answer: Again, decay can occur where the veneer and the tooth meet. But there are other issues that come up with veneers.
For example, someone who had a space between their front teeth, then through the use of veneers, the gap has been closed and the teeth have been reshaped. Now, the person has to be sure to use dental floss—his teeth are much closer together and more food can get stuck in between them.
Also, note how shiny the finish of the veneers is. There is a highly polished glaze on the porcelain for both veneers and crowns. Hygienists should have a special paste for polishing porcelain that won’t scratch this finish.

Question: What about bridges? How are those used to improve our smiles and what special care should we take if we have them?

Answer: A bridge can be used to close the gaps on someone who was born with teeth missing or has lost teeth.  However, food and debris can get stuck underneath the bridge. A proxy brush can be used to clean this out.

You go to the dentist to get the perfect smile. Now take care of it. My thanks to Dr. Marsh for helping us avoid problems “like a bridge over troubled . . . gums.” Okay, that’s the end of my singing career.

---Steve Marsh, DDS

For more information:
Steven Marsh, DDS
440-461-1003
www.ClevelandSmiles.com

BEHIND THE SCENES: THE MAKING OF CROWNS AND VENEERS

Dental Segment show 92

Air Date: 11/23/02

When Dr. Marsh joins us on Golden Opportunities, he often shows amazing before and after pictures that make it look easy to restore a smile with crowns and veneers. We thought you might be interested in going behind the scenes, to see the truly artistic effort that goes into creating that “crowning” glory, a beautiful smile.


Question:   Every time you’re on our program, we see the incredible results of cosmetic dentistry with your great before and after pictures. But a lot of work goes into restoring a smile. How is dental work created?
 

Answer:  Patients need dental work done for two main reasons: either they need their teeth to be restored after decay or they need cosmetic work.
Answer:  If restoration is needed, the first step would be to clean out the decay and reshape and re-contour the tooth. This is called preparing the teeth—making the tooth 1.5-2 millimeters smaller in size so that the bridge or crown will not be too large when placed over the tooth.
A mold is then made of the tooth with a rubber-like impression material.  The mold is then sent to a lab where they would make the crown based on the impression.

Question:   How does the lab make the dental work? How long does it take?
 

Answer: Each crown, veneer or bridge (series of crowns) is custom made. The porcelain begins as a wet, sand-like mixture. Artists sculpt it on the model of the teeth that the dentist sends them. The porcelain is then put into an oven at 1200 degrees and fused into glass. The final result receives a glazed finish.
The process usually takes 10 days to two weeks in time. I send my impressions to a lab in California that does excellent work.

 

Question: What is the crown or veneer comes back one-tenth of an inch off?

 

Answer: That’s why the original impression is so important.  And why picking a lab and keeping up with communication is so important.
Sometimes we can adjust it in the office, occasionally we must send it back to the lab to be repaired.

 

Question: What does the patient do while all this is going on?

 

Answer: The process takes about two weeks.  The dentist makes handmade acrylic temporary.
 

Question:   What about a purely cosmetic case?

Answer: An example is a person with a space between their front teeth.  The space can be corrected by veneers, which are made of porcelain and bonded on the teeth.
Another example would be a case in which a person was born missing teeth. This could be corrected with the use of a bridge (which is a series of crowns joined together).

A lot of work goes on behind the scenes when it comes to creating a picture perfect smile. It’s truly like sculpting a work of art. My thanks to our Michelangelo of teeth, Dr. Steven Marsh, for bridging our knowledge of crowns and veneers. If you’d like a free pamphlet, or if you just have questions, call Dr. Marsh’s office.

---Steve Marsh, DDS

For more information:
Steven Marsh, DDS
440-461-1003
www.ClevelandSmiles.com

DENTAL CASE PLANNING

Dental Segment show 196

Air Date: 12/28/02

If your eyes are the windows to your soul, then your teeth may be the reflection of your personality. Perhaps one of your New Year’s resolutions should be to update your smile. Here to explain how a mundane mouth can become a sensational smile is Dr. Steven Marsh.


Question: You want to improve your smile—but don’t know what the first step is. Dr. Marsh, what should we expect the first time we go to a dentist for cosmetic and/or restorative work?
 

Answer: When someone comes to my office for the first time, my assistant asks him/her about his/her medical history.
Next they get a tour of the office. If you are a new patient, you should be shown the dental equipment and the office’s computer capabilities. You should be shown where the sterilization takes place, and be able to see that all equipment is modern and clean.
You also get a chance to meet the staff and become comfortable with them.

Question: And then they get to meet you, right? What should your first conversation with the dentist entail when you are thinking about cosmetic or restorative work?
 

Answer: When I see a new patient, we first review their health history.  Then we speak about their dental needs—what bothers them? What do they want to have changed?
Next, we take a series of photos: both their smiles from the outside and their teeth from the inside with an intra-oral camera.
A thorough exam follows along with a complete set of x-rays. This is to ascertain the condition of the teeth and to check for oral cancer and other abnormalities (which can cause teeth to move). They teeth may also be cleaned at this visit.
 

Question: How do you decide what kind of cosmetic or restorative work needs to be done?

Answer: First the dentist gathers information and then meets with the patient to report the findings.
We co-diagnose. This means that I offer suggestions for treatment and then get feedback from the patient.
Be sure your dentist gives you options—there is more than one way to combat most problems.

Now here’s the thing about New Year’s resolutions. They’re easy to make, but they’re not worth much if they’re not kept. Don’t let your smile create the wrong impression about your beautiful personality. Why not give Dr. Marsh a call. We’ll be back.

---Steve Marsh, DDS

For more information:
Steven Marsh, DDS
440-461-1003
www.ClevelandSmiles.com

SMILE DESIGN

Dental Segment show 200

Air Date: 1/26/03

The way we look has a major impact on how others treat us. And your smile plays a big role in your appearance. Did you know that you can actually change and improve your smile? Here to explain how is Dr. Steven marsh.


Question: A beautiful smile is one of the most attractive features possible—but what makes a smile beautiful?
 

Answer: There are certain features that we find aesthetically pleasing when it comes to a beautiful smile. And we’re going to talk about these today.

Question: You’ve made a list of features we can go through today. The first is the color of the teeth.
 

Answer: Yes. Whiter teeth are more attractive. We’ve spoken about whitening before—you can have whitening trays made or now we have a procedure called Bright Smile that can whiten your teeth within an office visit.

Question: You mentioned a “smile line.” What does that mean?
 

Answer: We look at where the edges of the teeth are. The teeth should not go straight across.  They should be formed in a gentle curve, in the shape of a smile.

Question:    Can you tell us what had to be done for a “smile improvement"?
 

Answer: Yes. The teeth sometimes have to be reshaped, which is done with sanding or bonding.
Spaces need to be closed—done with bonding or veneers.
If you have a gummy smile, the gums may be recontoured, meaning that the gum tissue is raised to expose more of the teeth.

Question: How long does it take to completely re-do and improve a person's smile?
 

Answer: 2 to 8 appointments, over a 1 month time period.

Improve your life by improving your smile. It really can be done. Call Dr. Marsh if you have any questions, or to make an appointment.

 

---Steve Marsh, DDS

For more information:
Steven Marsh, DDS
440-461-1003
www.ClevelandSmiles.com

EXTREME DENTAL MAKEOVERS

Dental Segment show 204

Air Date: 2/23/03

(Please note: We do not offer makeovers.  We are simply reporting the results of makeovers done by Dr. Steven Marsh for his patients.)

 

First came extreme sports. Now there are extreme makeovers. New hairdos, new clothes, even tummy tucks and botox. But your smile is the first thing others notice about you. So here to show you the best in extreme dental makeovers is Dr. Steven Marsh.


Question: Last time you were on, we talked about a Golden Opportunities viewer who had a dental makeover, and several people have called to find out how such a major change was made. Let’s show that picture again.
 

Answer: This man saw a dental segment on Golden Opportunities and wanted his wife to get her teeth done. After being happy with the results, she insisted that he get the work done too.
As you can see, you can barely see the gentleman’s teeth in his before shot. As often happens with seniors, his teeth have been worn down, and the lips have dropped.
First decay was removed, then the teeth were rebuilt through the use of crowns.
As you can see, there’s a huge difference in the smile, and the smile is the first thing other people notice about you.

Question:   That is a huge difference. Let’s go through some more “extreme” dental makeovers.
 

Answer: Okay, this patient who had a number of broken teeth, old fillings, and decay.
First, we were concerned with the health of the gum tissue. Bone and tissue should be in optimal health before a dental makeover begins (you wouldn’t paint an old car without first taking care of the rust underneath). After treating the gums, the decay was cleaned out.
Altogether, we’ve rebuilt the smile line using veneers and gum contouring. Again, there’s a huge difference.

Question: Tell us about another case.


Answer: Because of his overlapping teeth, I suggested an orthodontist first, but he did not want to wear braces.
We whitened his teeth, contoured the gums, reshaped the teeth and put on veneers.

Question: A dental makeover can be used as a springboard for a more extensive makeover, correct?

Answer: Yes. We had a woman come to us who had written a book and was going on a speaking tour in support of it.
We whitened her teeth, and used crowns and veneers.  She also made over her hair, glasses…her entire look for a more youthful result.

Do you think you might look better with a dental makeover? A new smile can brighten your whole life! For more information about dental makeovers, give Dr. Marsh’s office a call.

---Steve Marsh, DDS

For more information:
Steven Marsh, DDS
440-461-1003
www.ClevelandSmiles.com

COMPUTER IMAGING AND YOUR TEETH

Dental Segment show 208

Air Date: 3/30/03

Pictures usually capture memorable moments in our past. But today we’ll show you how they can also offer a window into the future, the future of your smile. Here to explain is our forward-looking dentist Dr. Steven Marsh and one of his patients, Ginny Stenger.

Question: The last few times you’ve visited us, we’ve looked at smile makeovers and how you can develop a pleasing smile. But let’s take a step back to the beginning, when you’re not pleased with your teeth. When you’re planning a course of action with a smile makeover, is there a way for the patient to get an idea of exactly what’s possible?
 

Answer: Yes, there are a couple ways. First, we can take an impression of the person’s mouth and then create a model.
Wax can be used on the model so that the patient can see what can be achieved.
This method is still used, but technology has given us other choices as well, with photographic imagery.
 

Question: Can you explain a little about that?

 

Answer: When a patient comes in, I take a lot of photos of their mouth, with both a regular camera and a special machine called an imager.  The imager takes a picture of the mouth that is then stored in a computer.  I can draw on the image to show the patient what his/her teeth might look like after dental work is completed.
 

Question:   Ginny, you’re here today because Dr. Marsh used the imager to show you what your teeth could look like. Can you tell us about that experience?
 

Answer: I had planned braces and jaw surgery. But my teeth would still be old.  A woman in Pilates said I should see Dr. Marsh!
I went to see Dr. Marsh and we sat down and talked about the changes that I felt were important to make in regards to my smile.  He took a picture and put it on the computer, then drew over it to show results. Taking my comments, Dr. Marsh showed me what my mouth might look like.  After we decided to go ahead, it only took 2 appointments to complete the dental work.
 

Question: Ginny, did the work come out the way you thought it would?

 

Answer: Better!

The benefits of computer technology can be found everywhere, even in your dentist’s office! If you’re interested in projecting a better image, and looking into the future to see what a new smile can do for you, give Dr. Marsh’s office a call. My thanks to Dr. Steven Marsh and Ginny Stenger.

---Steve Marsh, DDS

For more information:
Steven Marsh, DDS
440-461-1003
www.ClevelandSmiles.com

THE MATERIALS DENTISTS USE TO IMPROVE YOUR SMILE

Dental Segment show 212

Air Date: 4/27/03

Dr. Marsh often gives us a sneak peek at the magic of cosmetic dentistry. But if dentists can’t use magic wands, how do they do it? What are the tools of the trade to transform a so-so smile into a super one? Here to explain is the David Copperfield of dentistry, Dr. Steven Marsh.

 

Question: Last time you were here, we discussed how a computer imager can be used to show dental patients how their “after” pictures might look before dental work even begins.  I know that a lot of people who watched the show were very interested in the imaging. But how do you get from the before picture to the perfect smile you’ve predicted with the imager? What materials are used?

 

Answer: Either composites (bonding) or porcelain are used, depending upon the type of work the needs to be done.

 

Question: Can you walk us through a few examples?

 

Answer: Yes. The first patient we are looking at broke off part of his tooth, but there was enough good tooth structure for me to bond the tooth using a composite.  Bonding is done by hand in the office by the dentist.  The finished result shows a tooth that appears whole.
 

Question:   Can bonding be used in most dental cases?

 

Answer: Although it works well in many cases, sometimes you need a stronger material. For example, large spaces between teeth might need a stronger material, such as porcelain. When we use porcelain, we prepare the teeth and then send models of a patient’s mouth to a laboratory where the porcelain veneers or crowns are created.
 

Question: What about gold? Is it still used in dental work?

 

Answer:  Yes, but primarily in the back, both for cosmetic reasons and because gold is a strong material and your back teeth require strength.

In the front, porcelain may be used OVER gold, again for strength.

When it comes to creating a natural looking, beautiful smile, there’s no black magic. Just quality work using quality materials. If you’d like to learn more, call Dr. Marsh’s office. The number’s next.

---Steve Marsh, DDS

For more information:
Steven Marsh, DDS
440-461-1003
www.ClevelandSmiles.com

YOUR TEETH AS YOU AGE - AND HOW TO RESTORE THEM

Dental Segment show 216

Air Date: 5/18/03

It’s unfortunate but true. As we age, our teeth grow older too. But there’s no need to frown. Cosmetic dentistry, extreme makeovers, can be a virtual fountain of youth for your smile. Here to explain is our very own Ponce De Leon of dentistry, Dr. Steven Marsh.


Question: As we age, our teeth change. Restoring your smile can actually help bring a more youthful smile, can it not?

 

Answer: Yes, aging teeth can be restored in several ways to create a younger look. First, I have the picture of a loyal Golden Opportunities viewer who came to me after watching the show and wanted a younger looking smile.

And this is what we were able to do.

 .

Question: That looks great. Now, what specifically changes in our mouths as we get older? What did you do to make that restoration?
 

Answer: If we look at a close up of the patient’s mouth, you can see that the teeth have shifted position, which is a common problem among seniors. This can be corrected through orthodontics, but that can take a long time.


However, through the use of crowns, veneers, or bonding, the spaces created by shifting can be closed within two visits to the dentist.

 

Question: What other problems are common in aging teeth?

 

Answer: Another big problem is that the teeth break down, whether due to decay, accidents, or just the normal wear and tear of chewing.
This photo is actually of the husband of our first model. As you can see, his teeth have worn down and are not even visible when he smiles


Again, the use of crowns and other cosmetic dentistry can improve the smile


 

Question: I’ve noticed that teeth seem to change color as we get older—they become more yellow. Why?

Answer: As people mature, the enamel of their teeth breaks down and reveals the more yellow, denten layer below. This simply happens from years of chewing and brushing.
Teeth can be whitened, however, whether through the traditional trays or new procedures like Bright Smile and Zoom that can be done in two hours at the dentist’s office.
Here we have a patient who not only needed to have her teeth whitened, but who also had chips that needed to be repaired

We whitened all of her teeth and used veneers (which matched the new, whiter color) to fix the areas where the teeth were fractured or worn down.



Are you ready to turn back the clock? If you’d like your smile to look like one of Doctor Marsh’s “after” photos, call his office.

 

---Steve Marsh, DDS

For more information:
Steven Marsh, DDS
440-461-1003
www.ClevelandSmiles.com

ZOOM WHITENING

Dental Segment show 221

Air Date: 7/13/03

Say cheese! If that request for a smile makes you want to cover your mouth, chances are your pearly whites aren’t so pearly white. Did you ever wish for a whiter, brighter smile? Today our expert may grant your wish. No, it’s not the tooth fairy. But we have the next best thing, our wizard of whitening, Dr. Steven Marsh.


Question: Nowadays, there are several options when it comes to whitening your smile, correct?
 

Answer:  Yes. First is the traditional use of trays. A person goes to the dentist and has impressions made of their teeth. Trays are then made from the impressions and, along with a whitening agent, are worn by the individual.
We’ve also talked about a relatively new whitening technique called “Bright Smile,” which takes about two hours in the dentist’s office.
 

Question:   Today we’re going to talk about a new whitening process called “Zoom.”
 

Answer:  Yes, Zoom is similar to Bright Smile but made by a different company. This is actually the procedure being used in the television series “Extreme Makeovers.”
In this procedure, the lips are pulled away from the teeth and a whitening gel is put on the teeth
A bright light is then shone on the teeth to cause the whitening.
You can watch TV or listen to headphones during the procedure.

After you whiten your pearly whites, it won’t bother you if a camera “zooms” in on your smile. To find out more about this quick whitening process, “Zoom” over to the phone and give Dr. Marsh a call. The number’s next.

---Steve Marsh, DDS

For more information:
Steven Marsh, DDS
440-461-1003
www.ClevelandSmiles.com

DENTAL MAKEOVERS

Dental Segment show 224

Air Date: 8/10/03

Extreme makeovers are all the rage. Right here on Golden Opportunities we’ve shown you some dramatic pictures demonstrating how a dentist can turn a mouth with major problems into a winning smile.  But you don’t have to go to extremes and undergo major dental work to create a smile that makes you happy. Here to explain how mini-makeovers can still give maximum benefits is Dr. Steven Marsh and one of his smiling patients, Lois Bialosky.

 

Question: We’ve looked at photos of extreme makeovers, where major changes were made to give the person a beautiful smile [photos of extreme case, before and after]. But you don’t have to have major problems in order to improve you smile, right?

 

Answer: Of course not. Minor changes can have a major impact on the beauty of your smile. And a makeover can have many stages, and can be done over time.
 

Question: Now Lois, you’re here today because you had your teeth made over one step at a time. What first brought you to Dr. Marsh?

 

Answer:  I normally wear a bite plate in the evening.  While on a week long trip, the bit plate broke. By the time I returned home, my teeth had moved. I looked into orthodontics, and it would be a complicated procedure. My periodonist recommended having my teeth bonded and sent me to Dr. Marsh. To this day, after about 10 years, the bonding is still fine.

 


Question: And that was okay for a while?


Answer: Yes, until Lois wanted something a little more permanent.
Lois: I had seen pictures of smile makeovers in Dr. Marsh’s office and finally asked him what could be done with my smile.

Dr. Marsh: So three years after the bonding, we looked at how we could improve Lois’ top teeth. In this photo, you can see that we used veneers on her top row of teeth, and then we recontoured and reshaped the bottom teeth, with no additional dental work on the bottom.


Question: And this year you finished up with the bottom?

 

Answer:  Yes, we just added veneers to the bottom teeth. Now they all match beautifully!



Question: Lois, why did you keep coming back for more? Why have the dental work done in the first place? Was it easy? Quick? Painless?
 

Answer: After having the top teeth done, I wanted the bottom to look the same.
The work took two appointments—the first where your teeth are prepared and the second when the veneers are put on.
There was minimal discomfort—just where the Novocain injection entered.

Mini-makeovers, can transform a decent smile into a special one. If you’re interested in making your grin great, call the number that’s coming up. My thanks to Dr. Steven Marsh and Lois Bialosky.

---Steve Marsh, DDS

 

For more information:
Steven Marsh, DDS
440-461-1003
www.ClevelandSmiles.com

LOWER TEETH

Dental Segment show 228

Air Date: 9/7/03

Look in the mirror and what do you see? As people get older, their lower teeth become more noticeable. And more crowded and crooked. Here to help us get to the “bottom” of lower teeth problems is Dr. Steven Marsh.

 

Question: Why do lower teeth appear to get so crowded?

 

Answer: As people get older, their teeth tend to drift.  In our lower teeth, there is what’s called a “midline drift.” All the teeth tend to move toward the center, crossing over each other.

 

Question:   What are some of the problems associated with the midline drift?

  • It changes your bite.

  • When the teeth are crowded, you can’t keep them as clean. This can lead to more staining and gum inflammation (because the debris cannot be removed).

  • And of course, crowded teeth do not look good aesthetically. This problem is more important for seniors.

Question: How so?

 

Answer: As we age, our upper lip drops. Therefore, when seniors speak, they show more lower teeth than upper teeth.

 

Question: What can be done? Can we see some examples?

 

Answer: How crowded your teeth are would determine which method would be used. Mild cases might just require reshaping the teeth or hand bonding. More extreme might require porcelain veneers or crowns.
Here we have an example of a mild case, where the teeth are turned slightly inward along the midline. Hand bonding, reshaping, and veneers were used to correct the teeth.

 

In the second example, we can see how the teeth are crowded. Veneers are used in the after shot.


 

Crowding of teeth can also lead to height discrepancies.

 

Question: We talk about upper teeth a lot. Have you had cases where a patient started by fixing his upper teeth and then moved on to his lower?

 

Answer: Yes, the work can be done over a period of time. For example, this patient began by having his upper teeth done (gum contouring, veneers and whitening). All that was done to the lower teeth initially was some reshaping.

After looking at the results, the patient wanted to have his lower teeth done for the color and uniformity. Lower veneers were used.


Don’t let unattractive lower teeth “lower” your self-esteem. For more information on how to “lower” the boom on bad bottoms, give Dr. Marsh a call.

 

---Steve Marsh, DDS

For more information:
Steven Marsh, DDS
440-461-1003
www.ClevelandSmiles.com